Nix the Salt Habit!

Do you tend to have a heavy hand with the salt?  If you do, you are not alone.  The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends a sodium intake that is no more than 2,300 mg/day for individuals 2 years of age and older – that is about 1 teaspoon of salt per day.  The recommendations for at-risk populations (African-Americans, adults 40 years and older, and hypertensive individuals) is lower, set at no more than 1,500 mg/day.  However, the average American consumes more than 3,400 mg/day of sodium.  Why is this so bad?  Sodium stimulates your kidneys to retain water.  This, in turn, increases your blood volume.  An increased blood volume can cause hypertension (high blood pressure).  And, hypertension increases your risk for developing heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, and kidney disease. 

Individuals who are at-risk and/or are  “salt sensitive” – that is, more susceptible to the effects of salt on the body – need to take particular care concerning sodium intake; however, all individuals need to lower consumption to reduce health risks.  Last April, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released its report Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States.  In this publication,  the IOM states that a collaborative effort is needed to reduce the amount of sodium Americans consume.  Part of this strategy entails new government standards for sodium content in foods produced by food manufacturers, restaurants, and foodservice providers.  The ultimate goal is to set a standard sodium level for commercially prepared foods that is considered to be safe.  This reduction is to occur graduallyso as to allow the American palate to adjust accordingly without change being significantly noticed.  Likewise, the IOM is calling upon Americans themselves to make wiser choices about food products and to limit sodium content in home-prepard foods.  Other sectors of society, such as health professionals and public-private corporations are asked to support the implementation of sodium guidelines by food producers as well as to encourage fellow Americans to follow a lower sodium diet.

How can you take action to reduce the sodium in your diet?

  • Gradually lower your intake of sodium to the recommended level.
  • Purchase items labeled as “low salt,” “low sodium,”  “no salt added,” and “sodium free.”
  • Avoid adding salt while cooking foods such as rice, pasta, whole-grain cereals, and vegetables.
  • Add flavor by using salt-free spices and herbs instead of salt.  Good salt-free alternatives include lemon-pepper blends, all-spice, paprika, curry powder, turmeric, dry mustard, caraway seeds, sesame seeds, basil, dill, and garlic.  Using lemon juice and vinegar can also add flavor without the need for salt.
  • Watch out for hidden sources of sodium, such as some over-the-counter and prescription medications, certain natural foods (e.g., olives and seafood), and baking soda and baking powder.

Although it is important to reduce your sodium intake to the recommended safe level, do not eliminate salt completely from your diet.  Sodium is essential for proper muscle function, neurotransmission of impulses and fluid regulation and balance in your body.

How have you reduced the amount of sodium in your diet?  Share with us, we want to know!

Sources for more  information

Institute of Medicine

American Dietetic Association

American Heart Association

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2 Comments

Filed under health, healthy eating tips, salt, seasonings, sodium, spices

2 responses to “Nix the Salt Habit!

  1. I rarely use salt, even in cooking. Like you said, there are many other seasonings that can be used where you don’t even miss the salt.

    I also don’t use many prepackaged foods.

    Sorry I’ve been M.I.A- the computers in the shop for a good cleaning 🙂

    I’m stuck with a library computer until then.

  2. Pingback: Various Food Service Career | Uncategorized | Information about Careers

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